Posts tagged "Drug Charges"

Legalized medical pot on the table in South Carolina

Across the United States, many individual states have allowed the use of marijuana for medicinal purposes for some time now. A few other states have even legalized the use of marijuana for recreational purposes. Thus far in South Carolina, there are no legally recognized uses for marijuana. However, this is something that may change if one State Senator is able to be successful in getting a bill passed and enacted.

When prescription medications could result in a DUI

Almost everyone has to take a prescription medication at some point during his or her lifetime. Whether a drug is prescribed for the short or long term, it may have the potential to adversely affect driving. A driver in South Carolina may have never gotten behind the wheel after drinking alcohol or taking illicit drugs, but could possibly face a DUI charge after being prescribed perfectly legal medications.

The cycle of drug addiction

Many people in South Carolina and around the nation have been hearing news reports lately about what many call the opioid epidemic. The country is finally starting to realize that all people who use drugs for other than intended medical purposes are not necessarily a bunch of criminals or losers. Instead, many of these people are simply ill and fighting an extremely difficult disease.

South Carolina and the details of methamphetamine

Thousands of Americans admit to having used methamphetamine in the recent past, and the majority of individuals serving drug sentences in the country are serving time on meth-related charges. The drug is widely used in the West, Midwest and Southern regions of the United States, with South Carolina as one of the areas with high reports of meth and crack cocaine. While the charges for methamphetamine use and trafficking can be severe, there are still thousands of arrests for the drug each year.

How a dog sniff search still affects South Carolina officers

The 2015 Supreme Court case of Rodriguez v. United States affects law enforcement officers in South Carolina and across the United States, from highway patrol to municipal officers. Though the case was decided a few years ago, its holding is still relevant and binding today.

Effects of prescription drug abuse

Prescription drug abuse has seen all-time high in recent years. The misuse of drugs such as opioids and benzodiazepines are only a few names in the world of drug abuse. In addition to the negative effects these chemicals can have on the body, prescription drug abuse has trickled into public health, social welfare, and even the outlook of future generations. Initially used for treatments such as the reducing of chronic pain and improving quality of life, prescription drugs have begun dominating South Carolina with crippling cases of dependence and addiction.  

Drug arrest derails teens planned Myrtle Beach trip

Teens in Florence can often be forgiven for exercising what some may term to be poor judgment due to their relative lack of experience and understanding. Often, their excitement and exuberance to fully participate in what may be perceived to be adult activities can cause them to overlook any potential consequences that they may face from engaging in them. Many often appreciate this fact, and hope that law enforcement officials will, as well. Yet the circumstances of an arrest may prompt authorities to forget this notion.

Good Samaritan law proposed to reduce heroin deaths

As heroin use rises across the country, South Carolina has also seen a spike in deaths from overdoses. The Washington Times reports that the state has seen a 57.1 increase in heroin fatalities between 2014 and 2015. According to CDC statistics across the country, from 2013-2014 there was a 26 percent rise in deaths from heroin overdose. One reason for these deaths is that heroin can be laced with other drugs that a user may not realize, which can affect the potency of the drug, for example fentanyl, which is 20 times more powerful than heroin, can be mixed in without a user’s knowledge resulting in his or her death. There were six known overdose deaths relating to fentanyl in 2016.